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VALUE CARD SET Game Instruction

The card sets „constructive values“ can be played (worked) spontaneously in a suitable group/round.

This variant is particularly suitable for small teams in organisations, among friends and sports teams.


Instructions (variant 5 cards)

A good and tested variant

Duration: approx. 1-2 hours

Number of players: 3-12

Materials needed: Set of cards „constructive values“ (136 pcs., version 2020) plus optional set of cards „destructive attributes“.

Each player (present, workshop participant, co-player [MS], participant etc.) gets 5 value cards at random from the deck. He is allowed to keep 2 of these 5 cards, which in his opinion suit him best or are very important to him.

Then he has to distribute the remaining 3 cards to the other players. In doing so, he weighs up which card suits the respective player/participant best.

Overall – after this allocation of all participants / fellow players – everything should be weighted in such a way that each participant has as many cards as possible, but this is not mandatory.

When this process is completed, each MS has to justify why he/she kept the two values – and gave the respective allocated values to the respective (corresponding) person.
Here, discussion and questioning by all MS is encouraged, but not an absolute must.

In the end, each MS should have the cards in front of him/her and be satisfied with them (relative personal agreement).

Note: You can find these and even more descriptions and variations in the booklet accompanying the VALUE game, which is currently available exclusively to our value coaches.


List of value types with symbols

Below we list the assignments of the types of values found on the playing cards. The respective list of terms can be found in the accompanying book, the definitions of all terms can be found in „The Big Book of Values“.


Agile values

A value or term that is used or should be considered in so-called „agile management“ (e.g. Scrum).
Agile management, project management and also agile corporate culture are not only modern and desired, but also sustainably successful in many areas and industries. Besides the so-called agile attitudes, principles and practices, there are „agile values“. Here we assign individual values to „agile management“. A short, purpose-specific description is added to the term.

Note: You can find the list of terms under aWerte (german) or in the accompanying book, the definitions of these terms can be found in „The Big Book of Values“.


Social skills

These values stand directly or indirectly (complementary or triggering) for the fact that a person possesses a so-called „social competence“ in order to be able to communicate or interact as a social being in the respective culture. With a certain number of social competences, one is accepted and recognised within a community of values.
Social competences are, for example, the former „head marks“ in school or so-called „skills“ in personnel management or personnel development as well as preferred character strengths in the widely used personality tests.

Note: The list of terms can be found under sWerte (german) or in the accompanying book, the definitions of these terms can be found in „The Big Book of Values“.


Action-Oriented values

These values either directly trigger action (experience) or they are a condition for being in action (value creation). Constructive values arise from this and are expressed through concrete actions.

Note: The list of terms can be found under hWerte (german) or in the accompanying book, the definitions of these terms can be found in „The Big Book of Values“.


Virtues

A virtue is a positive quality of a person, which is usually produced by an exemplary basic attitude (state of mind). Virtues are prescribed by the community of values.
Ideally, a virtuous behaviour, is a person’s personal and/or social aspiration to live according to these established basic values, which are prescribed by the respective sociological culture. In philosophical and theological ethics, the term refers to a certain character trait that is desirable and useful. The goal here is to realise oneself through morally good actions and, moreover, to serve as a role model.
Accordingly, the sum of certain virtues is a prerequisite for being accepted or gaining recognition in socio-cultural communities of values. The qualities described as virtues (e.g. attentiveness, punctuality, diligence, sense of order, loyalty) are understood as „desired“ values. These values are called virtue when they produce useful and valuable results for the general public. Below is a list of values that are considered virtues in many cultures.

Note: The list of terms can be found under tWerte (german) or in the accompanying book, the definitions of these terms can be found in „The Big Book of Values“; in particular, the so-called cardinal virtues[1] are also listed there.


Motive-based values

Many values are based on motives. In other words, the reason (motive) to be interested in something, to commit oneself to it or to regard it as important and valuable or to strive for it. Thus, there are numerous value concepts that are generally understood as values, but can also be called motives.
Constructive motives are charged with the intention to serve a meaningful (moral or ethical) cause. Some value terms can be classified as „characteristically moving“ (motivating) in this context.

Note: The list of terms can be found under mWerte (german) or in the accompanying book, the definitions of these terms can be found in „The Big Book of Values“.


Footnote

[1] A cardinal virtue (from Latin cardo = „pivot“) is also called a primary virtue. Ambrose of Milan (339 to 397) first used the term as „virtutes cardinales“. Thomas Aquinas (1225 to 1274) interpreted it figuratively as a „hinge“ (door hinge) to which all other virtues attach. In today’s context, a primary virtue can also be called a fundamental value, because virtues mostly represent value concepts. The sum of the cardinal virtues of the respective epoch in turn represent value systems. Cardinal virtues have been handed down since antiquity. We have compiled a list of the most important cardinal virtues (with assignment to the founders) in „The Big Book of Values“.

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